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  • President Obama Increases Minimum Wage for Employees of Federal Contractors

    On February 12, 2014, President Obama signed an executive order calling for an increase in the minimum wage for all work done pursuant to a contract with the U.S. government. Effective January 1, 2015, all employees performing work pursuant to a federal contract or “contract-like instrument” must receive no less than $10.10 per hour….

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  • Seventh Circuit finds that the FMLA applies when an employee requests leave to provide care for a terminally ill parent while that parent is travelling from home.

    On January 28, 2014, the Unites States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit issued a decision in the case of Ballard v. Chicago Park District, affirming the lower court’s decision to deny the employer’s motion for summary judgment. In Ballard, the plaintiff, who was her terminally ill mother’s primary caretaker, requested FMLA leave…

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  • Siegel & Dolan attorneys recognized by Super Lawyers

    Marc J. Siegel and Bradley Manewith have been recognized by Illinois Super Lawyers in the 2014 publication. This is the sixth nomination that Mr. Siegel has received from Illinois Super Lawyers, and the third consecutive year that he has been listed as one of the top 100 lawyers in Illinois by the publication. Mr….

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  • Employers may not Challenge Adequacy of EEOC Conciliation

    In an opinion issued on December 20, 2013, the Seventh Circuit held that an employer may not raise in litigation an implied affirmative defense that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) failed to adequately conciliate a case before filing a lawsuit alleging violations of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In…

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  • Bill introduced to curb intentional misclassification of employees

    Over the past few years, many employers have intentionally misclassified their workers as independent contractors instead of employees in order to reduce costs. By doing so, employers cheat their workers out of basic safeguards and benefits such as overtime, workers’ compensation, and unemployment insurance. They also deprive the government of tax revenue, and create…

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  • Employers may be Required to Reimburse H2-A Employee Travel Expenses in First Week of Work

    Under the Department of Labor’s H2-A program, an employer must reimburse its employee for the reasonable travel expenses incurred to arrive at the work location. However, the H2-A rules allow the employer to delay this payment until after the employee has performed 50% of the work for which the parties contracted. A recent decision…

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  • Senate Votes to Pass ENDA

    The Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) passed its final vote in the full Senate on Thursday. ENDA has been introduced in virtually every Congress since 1994. It is legislation that would amend Title VII to prohibit discrimination in the hiring and employment of individuals one the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. President Obama…

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  • Employer Violates the Stored Communications Act by Accessing Private Emails Stored on Former Employee’s Blackberry

    In today’s ever-changing world of electronic communications and social media, an employee’s right to privacy in the workplace continues to be a hot topic. More and more employees are faced with the prospect of their employers accessing their private e-mails, and social media accounts. In the recent case of Lazette v. Kulmatycki, et al.,…

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  • New Telephone Consumer Protection Act Rules Effective October 16, 2013

    The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”) is a federal law empowering individuals to file lawsuits for receiving unsolicited telemarketing calls, faxes, pre-recorded calls, or autodialed calls. It is sometimes referred to as the “Robocall” law. Under the TCPA, individuals may recover statutory damages of $500-$1500 per violation. On October 16, amendments passed by the…

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  • Department of Labor Says Law Students May Work as Unpaid Interns

    In a letter to the American Bar Association, the U.S. Department of Labor recently stated that law students may work as unpaid interns, as long as the intern works exclusively on pro bono, or non-fee-generating matters. In her letter, the Solicitor of Labor identified additional requirements the internship must satisfy to ensure compliance with…

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